What Kind of Job Applicant Are You?

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Different types of job applicant sitting while waiting in line
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Human resource managers have the daunting task of telling a job applicant’s intention. Not all job applicants, however, possess the same enthusiasm that new graduates have in them. Further, a few would just waltz in for a quick interview while others just need that much-needed experience. So, what type of job applicant are you?

Different Job Applicant Types

Different job seekers have different personas, and you may find yourself belonging to one of these categories:

which job applicant are you

1. The Proud and Award-Conscious Applicant

These guysmay be the strongest link. However, employers think that focusing merely on an applicant’s trophy case is just wrong. In addition, applicants often flaunt their medals on their portfolios and employers find that very creepy.

2. The Reserved One

Hiring managers often question themselves as, “What was I thinking inviting this person over for an interview?” Reserved job seekers wander into space, stammering in front of the interviewer and are not sure where they really are. Most reserved applicants happen to be ‘new graduates’ who are still  learning the do’s and don’ts of a  job interview.

3. The ‘I am just here to try my luck’ Applicant

It’s very sad to see applicants not exerting efforts to get a job. In addition, scores enter the interview room without appreciating the interviewer’s time to extract personal information out from them.

a job applicant

4. The Jumper

This one is a reference to the sci-fi flick, Jumper, where the hero has the strange ability to hop from one place to another through teleportation. Aspirants who jump from one job to another after a week or month is not uncanny, they are unprofessional. Hence, hiring managers stay away from these people.

5. The Currently Employed Applicant

Do not play it safe. Applicants who are still employed should not waste their time looking for a job. Otherwise, if you are unhappy with your job, resign and look for another opportunity.

Diane Williams has 15 years of experience mentoring human resource professionals and recruitment agency personnel.